• Who We Are

    City Parks Blog is a joint effort of the Center for City Park Excellence at the Trust for Public Land and the City Parks Alliance to chronicle the news and issues of the urban park movement. Read more about us.
  • Urban Park Issues

  • Enter your email address to receive notifications of new City Parks Blog posts by email.

  • Archives

  • Urban Green Cover Ad

“Ralph, Meet Sparky!” – Making the Most of Your Dog Park

By Lisa Neiman, City of Boulder Parks & Recreation

It’s early afternoon on a warm, sunny Wednesday. Couples are out for a glimpse of the iconic Flatirons, folks gather to debate the best coffee roasters in town and other groups are sitting on lawn chairs in a nearby grassy area.   But the real “community gathering” is among the 40+ dogs chasing each other, hopping in a kiddie pool, competing for tennis balls and lounging around. Welcome to Boulder, Colorado’s Valmont Dog Park.

Always in search of enhancing our visitor experience, I set out to find out document our doggie-destination journey and to find out what makes a great Dog Park (and what could make ours even better).
Continue reading

Boulder Gets “Bee Happy” to Prevent Hive Loss

By Yvette Bowden, Director of Parks and Recreation, City of Boulder

Welcome to Boulder, a lively town nestled at 5,430 feet against the scenic backdrop of Colorado’s Rocky Mountain Front Range. Our town is famed for its active lifestyle, 300+ days of sunshine a year, and an entrepreneurial spirit, crowning the quaint cityscape as America’s Startup Capital and among the nation’s “Best Places to Live”. Boulder’s unparalleled quality of life is at the core of our department’s commitment to cultivating a long-term vision for our community’s future, health, and well being – including our neighbors, the bees.

Yes, bees.

Honeybees have been around for millions of years and they have incredible abilities. Bee brains can defy time and bees have different personalities. They also play an important function in our environment. A third of our national food production depends on bee pollination. The U.S. Department of Agriculture estimates that honeybees pollinate 80% of the country’s crops. However, the national honeybee population is in steep decline.  Continue reading