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18 Amazon HQ2 finalists are ParkScore cities

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Like many people, we looked with interest at the list of Amazon HQ2 finalist cities and quickly those that are ParkScore cities. The exceptions are Montgomery County, MD and Toronto. We also substituted Arlington, VA for Northern Virginia. Here’s the list, the percentage of residents within a 10 minute walk to a park, and the 2017 ParkScore ranking:

  • Washington DC – 98%  – 4th
  • Arlington (we counted it as Northern Virginia) – 98% – 6th 
  • New York City – 97% – 7th
  • Chicago -97% – 11th
  • (Seattle is also ranked 11 with 94%)
  • Boston – 98% – 13th
  • Denver -86% – 20th
  • Philadelphia – 93% – 32nd
  • Raleigh – 54% – 35th
  • Pittsburgh – 84% – 39th
  • Austin – 54% –  46th
  • Miami – 80% – 48th
  • Atlanta – 66% – 50th
  • Dallas – 60% – 50th
  • Nashville – 38% – 53rd
  • Columbus – 52% –  56th
  • Los Angeles – 54% – 74th
  • Newark – 90% – 81st
  • Indianapolis – 32% – 98th

Congratulations to all of the finalists. We know that each of the cities listed above have dedicated parks departments and non-profit parks organizations who work together to program, maintain and expand their park systems for all residents. Regardless of which of these cities gets the Amazon HQ2, they could all use more parkland and more funding – for capital projects, programming and maintenance and operations right now. And it goes without saying that the city that gets selected is going to need even more parks and funding.

If you want to learn more about this cities and their park systems, visit The Trust for Public Land or our ParkScore websites.

The Importance of Public Space

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The following blog from Nelson Beckford, Senior Program Officer, A Strong Neighborhood Saint Luke’s Foundation, was originally published on Let’s Talk Philanthropy: a blog by Philanthropy Ohio.  

By definition, a public space is a social space that is open and accessible to people. Streets, public squares, plazas, parks and beaches are examples of public spaces. These spaces are a social utility or public good because they:

  • Promote democracy, inclusion and social cohesion allowing people from various socio-economic backgrounds to share common ground to celebrate, recreate, to remember, to reflect or protest.
  • Define a city or neighborhood, think Golden Gate Park, Public Square, Washington Square Park – the spaces are reflections of the values, culture and history of a place. Ditto with the simple neighborhood park.
  • Promote active living; when people live close to a park or trail, they walk more.

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These are just a few of reasons that drove the Saint Luke’s Foundation along with Philanthropy Ohio to form the Public Space Community of Practice. The members represent the full spectrum of public space work from funding, research, land disposition, land acquisition, planning, design and programming. The goal of the group is broad but simple: to reflect and learn from the multiple efforts happening in Cleveland around public spaces.

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We opened our first gathering with this check in question: “Public Spaces are important because____.”  From there we did some context setting, framing and highlighted public space efforts happening at various scales and across sectors, from a memorial pocket in honor of a police officer – Derrick Owens – killed in the line of duty, to a large-scale intergenerational playscape. We also gave a sneak preview of the landmark research effort – National Park Study – conducted by City Parks Alliance, the National Institute for Health and the RAND Corporation.

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Stay tuned for more information and/or opt in for one of the few remaining seats available on the Philanthropy Forward ‘17 “Why Parks Matter” learning tour where we will explore parks and public spaces that work and those that could better serve their nearby residents. If you haven’t registered, click here to sign up.

I challenge foundation staff and board to reflect on how our work (regardless of type of funding priorities/focus) touches on or is influenced by public spaces. As a member of society, take a moment to think about the value you, your family or neighbors get from the public spaces. Discuss.

 

The Power of City Parks

By Catherine Nagel, originally posted: Toro Grounds for Success

Nearly 80 percent of Americans live in urban and metropolitan areas. For them, city parks are an important part of everyday life, as places where children play, families recreate, and neighbors come together. For those who don’t have backyards, these local parks are often the closest experience to nature available. But beyond their outdoor recreation and community role, city parks also support local economies, offer transportation solutions and reduce environmental impacts such as storm water runoff.

Urban planners, elected officials and community advocates recognize these benefits and are taking a fresh look at city parks as powerful tools for supporting healthy, resilient and economically competitive cities.

Continue reading

ASCE Infrastructure Report Card on Parks

Every four years, the American Society of Civil Engineers puts together an National Insfrastructure Report Card assigning individual letter grades on a variety of insfrastructure categories and an overall letter grade on the USA infrastructure overall.

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Since 2005, Public Parks and Recreation have been one of the categories evaluated, earning a C- grade for 2005, 2009 and 2013. Sadly, in 2017, it’s gone to a D+, which mirrors the national overall grade. You can read the highlights of the report here and download a full copy here.

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A couple of key points here. First, the ASCE considers public parks and recreation as infrastructure, providing a wide variety of environmental and economic services, as we all know.  One example highlighted by the report is the work of the Trust for Public Land in Newark, NJ along the Passaic River, developing the Newark Riverfront Park.

Second, they focus primarily on federal and state reporting of parks – primarily drawing on work done by the National Park Service and supporting non-profit foundations, as well as State park systems. US city park systems aren’t included, but the Trust for Public Land through the Center for City Park Excellence will work to provide that information through our City Park Facts and ParkScore projects.

More importantly, they recommend a number of action items, including one that the Trust for Public Land and the City Parks Alliance are actively advocating for, including the reauthorization and full funding of the Land and Water Conservation Fund to support acquisition of land and easements on land at the federal, state, and local levels.  

More of their recommendations are here. 

Questions, comments?  Contact the Center for City Park Excellence at the Trust for Public Land via email at ccpe@tpl.org

 

 

 

Your Input Needed: Are public golf courses being converted to Parks?

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Applewood Golf Course, Golden, Colorado – photo credit: Brian Melody

Back in 2011, the Center for City Park Excellence wrote about a growing number of public golf courses being converted to parks.  In advance of the April release of the 2017 City Park Facts, we’re looking for more recent examples of US cities converting their golf courses to parks, so if you know of a recent example, please write to us at ccpe@tpl.org.

Here’s why we’re asking.

We’ve continued to hear about the closing of many privately owned golf courses over the last decade or so, the current total number of golf courses (according to a 2015 study by The R & A titled “Golf Around the World” is currently 15,372, down from a high of 16,052 courses around the year 2000.  We do know of many stories documenting  the transformation of  private golf courses into public parks. In fact, the Trust for Public Land was a partner in acquisition projects in Portland, Oregon,  Rancho Canada, California, and Golden, Colorado.

That said, the number of public golf courses in the 100 largest cities is currently 413, but the net decrease over the past five years is just three. Some cities have closed or transferred ownership and some cities have built or rebuilt golf courses as well.

Do you have an example or a story about new uses for a public golf course?  Let us know at ccpe@tpl.org.