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A Public-Private Partnership for the 21st Century

Each month, City Parks Alliance names one “Frontline Park” as a standout example of urban park excellence, innovation and stewardship from across the country. The program identifies city parks that find innovative ways to meet the unique challenges faced as a result of shrinking municipal budgets, land use pressures and urban neighborhood decay. In recognition of its innovative practices in partnerships and sustainable funding, Brooklyn Bridge Park has been named a Frontline Park.

Brooklyn Bridge Park is the product of more than 20 years of extensive community planning and advocacy.  For years after shipping activity ceased at the piers, the land sat empty and was isolated from surrounding neighborhoods.  Developing the site into a park was not straightforward or simple, given the waterfront location and proximity to a major highway.  Planning and design was further complicated by the need to consider the integrity of the shoreline, and to ensure that the park could withstand major floods, storm surges, and any rise in sea level, which would drive up future maintenance costs.  With a limited amount of public money available, other revenue streams would be necessary to ensure the park’s future viability.   Continue reading

Promoting Stewardship in Parks

Each month, City Parks Alliance names one “Frontline Park” as a standout example of urban park excellence, innovation and stewardship from across the country. The program identifies city parks that find innovative ways to meet the unique challenges faced as a result of shrinking municipal budgets, land use pressures and urban neighborhood decay. In recognition of its innovative practices in partnerships and volunteer engagement, Priest Point Park has been named a Frontline Park.

Priest Point is a park built by volunteers.  When the park was constructed, the city did not have the staff necessary to complete construction, and relied heavily on community members who donated their time and labor.  Volunteers cleared the landscape, restored historic structures, installed landscaping features, and cleared trails throughout the park.  At 314 acres and more than a century old, Priest Point is both the city’s largest and oldest park, and still relies heavily on volunteer engagement for general maintenance.  This history of volunteerism in Olympia provided the basis for a culture of stewardship that has since grown to encompass all of the urban parks and forests in the city.  Continue reading

A Link to the Past

Each month, City Parks Alliance names one “Frontline Park” as a standout example of urban park excellence, innovation and stewardship from across the country. The program identifies city parks that find innovative ways to meet the unique challenges faced as a result of shrinking municipal budgets, land use pressures and urban neighborhood decay. In recognition of its innovative practices in community engagement and fundraising, Railroad Park has been named a Frontline Park.

“We’re proud when Railroad Park earns recognition because it shows that outside groups see what our frequent visitors see.  City Parks Alliance studies urban parks across the continent.  They track parks’ impact on surrounding communities, and they highlight green spaces that revitalize and contribute significantly to their cities,” said Jim Emison, President of the Railroad Park Foundation Board of Directors.  “That’s Railroad Park Foundation’s mission for Birmingham, and it’s wonderful to be recognized for those results.  Parks in New York and Toronto and Chicago and Los Angeles have received this distinction in the past, as has Birmingham’s own Red Mountain Park.  We’re proud to be in the company of such visionary park leadership that actively works to improve communities.”  Continue reading

A Green Mile

Each month, City Parks Alliance names one “Frontline Park” as a standout example of urban park excellence, innovation and stewardship from across the country. The program identifies city parks that find innovative ways to meet the unique challenges faced as a result of shrinking municipal budgets, land use pressures and urban neighborhood decay. In recognition of its innovative practices in community engagement and fundraising, Scioto Mile has been named a Frontline Park.

As a state capitol and university town with a solid population base and diverse economy, Columbus has historically fared much better than other Midwestern cities during national depressions and recessions, but it is not immune to the problem of vacant properties and disinvestment from the urban core. The existing amenity with the most potential to help reactivate downtown Columbus was the Scioto riverfront, which was also the most neglected. A massive public-private partnership was formed between the city of Columbus and local companies to design and fund the revitalization of the riverfront, which would refurbish and connect the two anchor parks on either end of the mile. With an initial $20 million commitment from the city and American Electric Power, construction on the ambitious plan began in 2008 and the riverfront was re-opened to the public in 2011.  Continue reading

A Centennial Celebration

Each month, City Parks Alliance names one “Frontline Park” as a standout example of urban park excellence, innovation and stewardship from across the country. The program identifies city parks that find innovative ways to meet the unique challenges faced as a result of shrinking municipal budgets, land use pressures and urban neighborhood decay. In recognition of its innovative practices in community engagement and fundraising, Hermann Park has been named a Frontline Park.

“Broad community support has been vital to the renaissance of Hermann Park.  Volunteers have been vital to every aspect — from guiding the planning and construction process to devoting over 20,000 hours each year to caring for the Park,” said Doreen Stoller, Executive Director of Hermann Park Conservancy.  “We are grateful to the City parks Alliance for recognizing the value of community engagement in the public-private partnerships that have created magic in so many urban parks.”

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