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Klyde Warren Park: Picture Perfect P3

When it comes to a potential model for the future of city parks, Klyde Warren Park in Dallas, Texas may not stand out among others purely based on looks, but it represents a leap forward in thinking about funding and how to develop parks in car-oriented cities.

Photo Courtesy of Klyde Warren Park

Proposed as a deck above the Woodall Rodgers Freeway, the cap park required $110 million worth of funding to be split between the city of Dallas, the state of Texas, and the private sector. In the end, the city contributed $20 million in bond funds, the state contributed $20 million in highway funds, $16.7 million came from stimulus funding, and the private sector filled the gap when public funds fell short. More than $50 million was donated from private sources, and the Woodall Rodgers Park was renamed Klyde Warren, after the son of donor Kelcy Warren.  Unlike other public-private partnerships in the city, such as the zoo and the arboretum, Klyde Warren Park does not receive any operating subsidy, nor does it charge admission. Continue reading

A Centennial Celebration

Each month, City Parks Alliance names one “Frontline Park” as a standout example of urban park excellence, innovation and stewardship from across the country. The program identifies city parks that find innovative ways to meet the unique challenges faced as a result of shrinking municipal budgets, land use pressures and urban neighborhood decay. In recognition of its innovative practices in community engagement and fundraising, Hermann Park has been named a Frontline Park.

“Broad community support has been vital to the renaissance of Hermann Park.  Volunteers have been vital to every aspect — from guiding the planning and construction process to devoting over 20,000 hours each year to caring for the Park,” said Doreen Stoller, Executive Director of Hermann Park Conservancy.  “We are grateful to the City parks Alliance for recognizing the value of community engagement in the public-private partnerships that have created magic in so many urban parks.”

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Denver Parks on Parade

Earlier this month, more than 30 park professionals from the US and Canada were hosted by Denver Parks and Recreation Department in collaboration with City Parks Alliance for a tour of their park system. Eighteen cities were represented, including teams from Los Angeles and Pittsburgh.

Photo courtesy of Hope Gibson

Photo courtesy of Hope Gibson

The Denver team put on a first class demonstration of their expertise in planning, design, construction and programming – from the smallest neighborhood park to Red Rocks Amphitheater, a part of Denver’s mountain parks system – and in every case showing us how a twenty-first century city parks department operates: seamlessly.

From the neighborhood partnerships to the collaboration with their own city departments to alliances with social service providers, arts and music organizations, and other parks programmers, Denver’s parks department uses and leverages all the value that parks offer and its mission can muster. Citywide partners like the Trust for Public Land – perfectly exemplifying its urban mission – and the Colorado Health Foundation are working closely with the department on many of its projects; as are local developers, transit, and bicycling partners. On some of our park visits it was hard to tell who worked for whom; in fact, most simply said they worked for the parks.

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Designing Tattnall Square Park’s Rain Gardens

By Andrew Silver, Friends of Tattnall Square Park

RG1I’d never have imagined that people would love our park’s new rain gardens as much as they have, and I wouldn’t have imagined that they’d have looked so good after so little time. Still, when Friends of Tattnall Square Park first teamed with Mercer engineering students to design a rain garden, we had no idea that the road to success would take months of planning, changes, revisions, and tweaking. All we knew is that we had an oversized 60-plus car parking lot, a tiny inlet into the park, and lots of erosion and storm water eventually heading down the sewer at the low end of our park, sweeping sediment and pollutants along with it. The rain gardens have become some of the most popular sites in the park, but in order to spare you some of our steep learning curve, here are some rain garden tips that I wish would have been emphasized more in the sources we consulted. Continue reading

The Living Laboratory

Each month, City Parks Alliance names one “Frontline Park” as a standout example of urban park excellence, innovation and stewardship from across the country. The program identifies city parks that find innovative ways to meet the unique challenges faced as a result of shrinking municipal budgets, land use pressures and urban neighborhood decay. In recognition of its innovative practices in environmental education programming, Washington Park has been named a Frontline Park.

“The Urban Ecology Center first came across City Parks Alliance as the ‘go to’ place to learn and share best practices for urban parks and are deeply honored that our Washington Park branch has been recognized on the national scale,” said Beth Fetterley Heller, Senior Director of Education and Strategic Planning for the Urban Ecology Center. “Washington Park is a gem in the heart of Milwaukee that has seen amazing revitalization in the past decade.  This award belongs to the community, as we could not have created a safe place for children and families to learn and play without deep engagement from community partners, businesses, neighbors and supporters.”

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